85% of Medicare Meaningful Use Early Adopters Attested from 2011-2013

The latest estimates from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid services show that 85% of Meaningful Use early adopters attested successfully for the third consecutive year.

Last year, 224,000 total eligible professionals attested. Below is a breakdown of that number:

  • 63,000 first-year attesters
  • 114,000 second-year attesters
  • 47,000 third-year attesters

However the majority of eligible providers have attested to stage 1 only, with a limited number moving on to stage 2 adoption. Providers are not worried because while stage 2 is off to a slow start, they are optimistic that it will pick up.

Some other statistics show:

  • 94% of eligible hospitals have registered for Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive programs
  • 90% of hospitals have been paid through the program
  • 56% of professionals are registered for Medicare
  • 28% of professionals are registered for Medicaid
  • 15% of professionals have not registered for either

In February, 9,387 providers registered for the EHR incentive program, for a total of 458,137 eligible providers who are registered.

That number broken down is:

  • 302,244 Medicare eligible professionals
  • 151,182 Medicaid eligible professionals
  • 4,711 eligible hospitals

For more information on these results see the article published by Heath Data Management here- http://www.healthdatamanagement.com/news/Medicare-Meaningful-Use-Early-Adopters-Attested-47834-1.html


Interoperability Could Save $30 Billion Nationally

According to the latest white paper released by Gary & Mary West Health Institute and the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology, greater interoperability of mobile medical devices not only allows for better communication, but has the potential to save the nation more than $30 billion a year in wasteful healthcare spending.

Greater medical device interoperability will lead to increased efficiency, improved quality, and more affordable care. Commonly adopted standards can accelerate the move toward greater medical device interoperability and potentially reduce the cost of achieving it.

The paper also highlights that while mobile interoperability is being quickly adopted, some healthcare professionals are treading lightly. They claim there is still work to be done to bring the newly developed mobile health IT to mainstream usage and understand its vast benefits on a larger scale.

The goal of the ONC is to make the technology patient-centered, allowing a patient’s health information to be accessible to them wherever they get their care. The main objective is to help improve patient care and health at lower costs.

For more information on interoperability and mobile health IT, follow the link to an article published by Health IT Outcomes- http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/interoperability-could-save-billion-nationally-0001